How to choose a perfect domain name

Most domain names have already been taken – so finding the ideal name can be difficult. Here’s a few ideas to find your perfect domain name.

  1. Use-hyphens.

    If your name or business name has two words try your search using a hyphen between each word.
    For example: bay-mobiles.com

  2. Search using a new TLD.

    Don’t get too hung up on dot coms. There are a bunch of new Top Level Domain endings such as .club .tech .bar .cab

  3. Add your country.

    This works best when you don’t use a country domain ending. For example baymobilesUK.com

  4. Check domain availability before deciding on your trade name.

    This works best for new business without an existing name. Be creative in the search tools… Think something up, see if it’s available… Repeat until you find something you’d like to use as your trade name.

  5. Be local.

    If your business serves a local area then include it in the name.
    For example: WestDerbyKennels.uk
    But be careful… Some regions or cities, for example Champagne or Sheffield, have restrictions on using their names.

  6. Google it.

    Always do a search of your proposed name on Google to make sure you’re not breaching trademarks.

  7. Use a consultant.

    There are branding pros who offer services to businesses and individuals who need to establish a successful brand identity. They cost a little extra, but a good branding pro can make a huge difference and save legal bills later on.

  8. Use your imagination.

    MAke words up – trendy new words that never existed before are commonplace as brands now. Try random words that look good together and maybe you’ll get lucky.

  9. Check out domain auction sites.

    Domain names are often auctioned off or sold at a fixed price. Be sure to check if the name has a history before you buy.

  10. Avoid…

    …Spammy names and long numbers. These look bad and won’t do your business any good.
    …referring to anything royal or governmental – crown copyright is seriously protected and needs permission form the authorities or someone who’s wardrobe includes a crown shelf.
    …Using any domain name that could be mistaken for a recognisable or existing brand.

This Business Tip has been provided by: Stu Wilson
I'm an independent brand co-ordinator on behalf of VCs to secure suitable image and IP development. My clients include two established brands and several well funded startups.

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